RESEARCH ARTICLE


Addiction to Tanning – A New Cause of Early Onset of Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer



Uwe Wollina*
Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Hospital Dresden-Friedrichstadt, Academic Teaching Hospital of the Technical University of Dresden, Friedrichstrasse 41, D-1067 Dresden, Germany


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© 2009 Uwe Wollina

open-access license: This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Public License (CC-BY 4.0), a copy of which is available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode. This license permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

* Address correspondence to this author at the Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Hospital Dresden-Friedrichstadt, Academic Teaching Hospital of the Technical University of Dresden, Friedrichstrasse 41, D- 1067 Dresden, Germany; Tel: +49-351-4801685; Fax: +49-351-4801219; E-mail: Wollina-uw@khdf.de


Abstract

Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common non-melanoma skin cancer world wide. UV exposure plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of this tumor that is more common in older people. In the past, BCC in people younger than 30 years of age have been seen in connection with genetic diseases like Gorlin-Goltz syndrome. The histological type was mostly superficial and most common localization was on the trunk. Nowadays, frequent indoor tanning is a risk behavior that might lead to early development of facial and aggressive BCC in people younger than 30 years of age. This is illustrated by a case report of a 29-year old addictive indoor tanner, skin type I, who developed a solid BCC of the nose after more than 10 years of weekly tanning. Current health campaigns and preventive programs seem to be ineffective in this subgroup of patients. New strategies need to be developed.

Keywords: Non-melanoma skin cancer, basal cell carcinoma, frequent indoor tanning, UV-light exposure.